Archive for Fun Facts

Fun Fact

It’s been awhile since I’ve shared fun facts! I’m a floater—I work the reference desks as needed in each of our specialized departments—so I’m always looking for opportunities to become better acquainted with each department’s reference collection. Yesterday afternoon I was in our Business Department with Linda and she introduced me to a really cool set of books—The Value of a Dollar. Did you know that the cost of a first class postage stamp was more expensive in 1900 (.41) than in 2000 (.33)???

The Value of a Dollar presents a large collection of information about item prices, consumer spending, investments and income. Whether you are a serious historical researcher or someone simply curious about “the good old days”, this set has a lot to offer! Look for both the 1600-1865 and the 1860-2004 volumes.

Leave a comment »

Fun Fact

I’ve temporarily set aside Ancestry’s Red Book: I’m now skimming ‘The Source: A Guidebook to American Genealogy’. According to The Source, prior to the Civil War, people could be criminally prosecuted for which of the following:

a) gossiping

b) witchcraft

c) scolding a husband

d) being disrespectful to a minister in public

e) refusing to attend church services

f) all of the above

Comments (1) »

Fun Fact

Ancestry’s Red Book yields up another interesting bit of knowledge. Before 1940, in the state of Indiana, it was necessary for a couple to obtain their marriage license from the county in which the bride-to-be lived. If your Indiana ancestors’ marriage record from this time can’t be found in the appropriate county records, check the Cincinnati marriage records–at this time, Cincinnati was a ‘no questions asked’ marriage locale for IN, KY and OH. **My colleague, the esteemed JB, also mentioned that St. Joseph county in MI was another likely ‘no questions asked’ locale, particularly for Hoosiers in NE Indiana.

Leave a comment »

Fun Fact

During a lull at the reference desk, I decided to brush up on some Genealogy resources–and came across an interesting bit of trivia. According to Ancestry’s Red Book, New England towns used to have an official called a “Hayward” or “Hog Reeves”. This official was responsible for keeping one person’s animals out of another person’s property. Haywards were elected annually at the town meeting, and were often but not always, the most recently married men in town. (1989 edition, page xviii).

Leave a comment »